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Flake, Coons Forge Rare Bond in US Senate

Republican Sen. Jeff Flake of Arizona and Democratic Sen. Chris Coons of Delaware forged their friendship in Africa, thousands of miles away from the divisiveness of Washington.

Both spent formative time there as young men in the early 1980s — Coons studying in Kenya during college, Flake doing his mission for the Mormon church in southern Africa — and they bonded over their shared interest on a Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee. They traveled to the continent multiple times together, fighting wildlife trafficking, promoting economic development, spending time with a dictator and even being chased by elephants once in 2016.

Flake, who is retiring from Congress this year, said at an event with Coons in Washington on Tuesday that it was that bipartisan bonding — so rare in the Senate these days — that made it possible for them to come together last week and urge an FBI investigation into sexual assault accusations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. The development delayed Kavanaugh’s final confirmation vote and eased, temporarily, some of the partisan wrath over the nomination.

“We’ve been through a lot,” Flake said, recounting, among other adventures, a four-hour meeting with former Zimbabwean dictator Robert Mugabe and a safari outing gone wrong that led to elephants chasing their vehicle. “And the trust that you develop working with each other on issues like that … that’s how compromises are possible, and there’s less and less of that going on.”

Rare relationships

Bipartisan friendships, especially in the Senate, weren’t always so rare. But in 2018, locked in a political fight that could determine the direction of the Supreme Court for a generation, senators have found little reason to reach across the aisle.

Flake’s decision to call for an FBI investigation came a day after an all-day hearing in which California professor Christine Blasey Ford testified that she was sexually assaulted by Kavanaugh in the early 1980s when both were in high school. Kavanaugh also testified, forcefully denying the claim and blaming Democrats.

At a Senate Judiciary Committee meeting the next day, Republicans angrily defended Kavanaugh and some Democrats walked out, protesting a committee vote on Kavanaugh they said was being rushed.

Coons stayed in the room and proposed a one-week delay, in which time an FBI investigation could be conducted. Flake later called it a “sober, rational speech.”

After Coons spoke, Flake walked around the dais, tapped him on the shoulder and motioned into the anteroom, where the two began negotiations. With tight margins in the Senate, Flake had the power to withhold his vote and force an investigation. Republicans and Democrats were in and out of the anteroom, but Flake wanted to talk to Coons, and at one point the two ended up alone in a small phone booth for privacy.

‘It felt real’

Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., was an early part of the discussions. She said Flake listened to others, but that his friendship with Coons was a key part of his final decision.

“What I liked about it was that it felt real,” she said of the talks between them.

On Friday, shortly after the deal was announced, Coons teared up talking about Flake, calling him his “role model” and mentioning their trips to Africa. He said then that Flake feels passionately that division in the U.S. “teaches the wrong thing to the world about our democracy, and suggests that we are not able to respect each other or work together.”

Several days later, Coons told The Associated Press that he sees his friendship with Flake as in the mold of two other senators from Delaware and Arizona: former Vice President Joe Biden and the late Republican Sen. John McCain, who died this summer after battling brain cancer. Each served more than three decades in the Senate, and Biden gave a eulogy at one of McCain’s funerals in August.

Coons and Flake attended McCain’s funeral together.

“I am determined, in John’s memory, to try to keep building relationships like that,” Coons said. “And Jeff has been one of the greatest partners I’ve had in my eight years here.”

Coons says he’s emotional about Flake’s decision to retire, which came after differences with President Donald Trump and others in his party. He said he is also struggling with the retirement of Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker, R-Tenn., with whom he has worked closely, and the death of McCain. All three questioned Trump’s leadership and occasionally bucked their party.

Coons says he has considered not running for re-election in 2020, but “I look forward to considering to serve if I can find legislative partners comparable to Jeff Flake and Bob Corker, whom I will dearly miss.” He noted this year’s Democratic primary in his state, in which longtime Democratic Sen. Tom Carper was challenged from the left. Carper won the race handily, but Coons says he is concerned in some ways about the increasingly divisive direction of politics within his party.

He adds, somewhat jokingly: “No rational person would do this job and say, ‘I’m loving it.’ ”

Trust is key

Virginia Sen. Mark Warner, the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee who has worked closely with the Republican chairman, North Carolina Sen. Richard Burr, on the panel’s Russia investigation, says bipartisan relationships are rooted in deep trust.

“I think that’s what Americans want from us, to have these relationships,” Warner said, “It means at some point you have to be willing to show that you aren’t always going to be reflexively for your own team.”

Flake is less certain that voters want to see cooperation. He says there’s no currency, or incentives, to work together in a polarized political climate. He says he is leaving the Senate because he “simply couldn’t run the kind of campaign I figured I’d need to run.”

Speaking of Coons, he said, “The thing I will miss the most about the Senate is relationships like this.”

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Flake, Coons Forge Rare Bond in US Senate

Republican Sen. Jeff Flake of Arizona and Democratic Sen. Chris Coons of Delaware forged their friendship in Africa, thousands of miles away from the divisiveness of Washington.

Both spent formative time there as young men in the early 1980s — Coons studying in Kenya during college, Flake doing his mission for the Mormon church in southern Africa — and they bonded over their shared interest on a Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee. They traveled to the continent multiple times together, fighting wildlife trafficking, promoting economic development, spending time with a dictator and even being chased by elephants once in 2016.

Flake, who is retiring from Congress this year, said at an event with Coons in Washington on Tuesday that it was that bipartisan bonding — so rare in the Senate these days — that made it possible for them to come together last week and urge an FBI investigation into sexual assault accusations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. The development delayed Kavanaugh’s final confirmation vote and eased, temporarily, some of the partisan wrath over the nomination.

“We’ve been through a lot,” Flake said, recounting, among other adventures, a four-hour meeting with former Zimbabwean dictator Robert Mugabe and a safari outing gone wrong that led to elephants chasing their vehicle. “And the trust that you develop working with each other on issues like that … that’s how compromises are possible, and there’s less and less of that going on.”

Rare relationships

Bipartisan friendships, especially in the Senate, weren’t always so rare. But in 2018, locked in a political fight that could determine the direction of the Supreme Court for a generation, senators have found little reason to reach across the aisle.

Flake’s decision to call for an FBI investigation came a day after an all-day hearing in which California professor Christine Blasey Ford testified that she was sexually assaulted by Kavanaugh in the early 1980s when both were in high school. Kavanaugh also testified, forcefully denying the claim and blaming Democrats.

At a Senate Judiciary Committee meeting the next day, Republicans angrily defended Kavanaugh and some Democrats walked out, protesting a committee vote on Kavanaugh they said was being rushed.

Coons stayed in the room and proposed a one-week delay, in which time an FBI investigation could be conducted. Flake later called it a “sober, rational speech.”

After Coons spoke, Flake walked around the dais, tapped him on the shoulder and motioned into the anteroom, where the two began negotiations. With tight margins in the Senate, Flake had the power to withhold his vote and force an investigation. Republicans and Democrats were in and out of the anteroom, but Flake wanted to talk to Coons, and at one point the two ended up alone in a small phone booth for privacy.

‘It felt real’

Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., was an early part of the discussions. She said Flake listened to others, but that his friendship with Coons was a key part of his final decision.

“What I liked about it was that it felt real,” she said of the talks between them.

On Friday, shortly after the deal was announced, Coons teared up talking about Flake, calling him his “role model” and mentioning their trips to Africa. He said then that Flake feels passionately that division in the U.S. “teaches the wrong thing to the world about our democracy, and suggests that we are not able to respect each other or work together.”

Several days later, Coons told The Associated Press that he sees his friendship with Flake as in the mold of two other senators from Delaware and Arizona: former Vice President Joe Biden and the late Republican Sen. John McCain, who died this summer after battling brain cancer. Each served more than three decades in the Senate, and Biden gave a eulogy at one of McCain’s funerals in August.

Coons and Flake attended McCain’s funeral together.

“I am determined, in John’s memory, to try to keep building relationships like that,” Coons said. “And Jeff has been one of the greatest partners I’ve had in my eight years here.”

Coons says he’s emotional about Flake’s decision to retire, which came after differences with President Donald Trump and others in his party. He said he is also struggling with the retirement of Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker, R-Tenn., with whom he has worked closely, and the death of McCain. All three questioned Trump’s leadership and occasionally bucked their party.

Coons says he has considered not running for re-election in 2020, but “I look forward to considering to serve if I can find legislative partners comparable to Jeff Flake and Bob Corker, whom I will dearly miss.” He noted this year’s Democratic primary in his state, in which longtime Democratic Sen. Tom Carper was challenged from the left. Carper won the race handily, but Coons says he is concerned in some ways about the increasingly divisive direction of politics within his party.

He adds, somewhat jokingly: “No rational person would do this job and say, ‘I’m loving it.’ ”

Trust is key

Virginia Sen. Mark Warner, the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee who has worked closely with the Republican chairman, North Carolina Sen. Richard Burr, on the panel’s Russia investigation, says bipartisan relationships are rooted in deep trust.

“I think that’s what Americans want from us, to have these relationships,” Warner said, “It means at some point you have to be willing to show that you aren’t always going to be reflexively for your own team.”

Flake is less certain that voters want to see cooperation. He says there’s no currency, or incentives, to work together in a polarized political climate. He says he is leaving the Senate because he “simply couldn’t run the kind of campaign I figured I’d need to run.”

Speaking of Coons, he said, “The thing I will miss the most about the Senate is relationships like this.”

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Battle Over Kavanaugh Intensifies Midterm Campaign

In five weeks, U.S. voters head to the polls to elect a new Congress and the outcome will have a profound impact on the next two years of Donald Trump’s presidency. Intensity is building for the Nov. 6 election, especially among opposition Democrats seeking to win back control of the House of Representatives. But the polarizing battle over Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh seems to be mobilizing voters in both political parties, as we hear from VOA National correspondent Jim Malone.

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Kavanaugh Nomination Puts US Senate to the Test

A basic function of America’s constitutional system, filling a Supreme Court vacancy, has been thrown into chaos following accusations of sexual misconduct against nominee Brett Kavanaugh and the intrusion of hyper-partisanship into the judicial confirmation process. VOA’s Michael Bowman reports, the Senate is under intense scrutiny as it struggles to provide “advice and consent” in confirming or rejecting a Supreme Court nominee one month before midterm elections that could reshape Congress.

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Kavanaugh Nomination Puts US Senate to the Test

A basic function of America’s constitutional system, filling a Supreme Court vacancy, has been thrown into chaos following accusations of sexual misconduct against nominee Brett Kavanaugh and the intrusion of hyper-partisanship into the judicial confirmation process. VOA’s Michael Bowman reports, the Senate is under intense scrutiny as it struggles to provide “advice and consent” in confirming or rejecting a Supreme Court nominee one month before midterm elections that could reshape Congress.

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Kavanaugh Battle Intensifies Midterm Campaign

In five weeks, U.S. voters head to the polls to elect a new Congress and the outcome will have a profound impact on the next two years of Donald Trump’s presidency.

Intensity is building for the Nov. 6 election, especially among opposition Democrats seeking to win back control of the House of Representatives.  But both parties could become energized, depending on the outcome of the polarizing confirmation battle over Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

During the weekend, President Trump was on the campaign trail in West Virginia, whipping up support for Kavanaugh and blasting Democrats.

“I’m not running, but I’m really running and that is why I am all over the place fighting for great candidates,” Trump told the crowd in Wheeling, West Virginia.  “You see what is going on, you see those horrible, horrible, radical group of Democrats and you see it happening right now.”

Emotional hearing

The fight over Kavanaugh has animated those in favor of the judge and those opposed in the wake of a sexual assault allegation made by California professor Christine Blasey Ford.

Ford detailed the alleged assault in emotional and riveting testimony last week before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

“Brett’s assault on me drastically altered my life.  For a very long time, I was too afraid and ashamed to tell anyone the details.”

Supporters have rallied around Kavanaugh after the judge issued a combative denial later in the hearing.

“This confirmation process has become a national disgrace.  You have replaced advice and consent with search and destroy.”

A final Senate vote on Kavanaugh is on hold until the FBI completes an investigation related to the allegations aired in the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing.  Trump said Monday he wants a “comprehensive investigation” but he also added, “I’d like it to go quickly.”

Declining support

A new Quinnipiac University poll found that 48 percent of Americans surveyed oppose Kavanaugh’s confirmation, while 42 percent are in favor.  Women voters in particular oppose Kavanaugh’s appointment by a margin of 55 to 37 percent.  Men support the judge, 49 to 40 percent.

Amid the furor over Kavanaugh, Trump is making a furious push around the country to help Republicans hold their narrow majority in the Senate.

“Promise me, you have to get out for the midterms,” Trump implored supporters during a recent rally in Las Vegas, Nevada.  “Don’t be complacent.  You have got to get out for the midterms.  You have got to vote.”

Many Democrats seem cautiously optimistic about their chances in November of flipping the House of Representatives back under their control.

But even House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi says the party still has to follow through by turning out voters.  “Seeing the urgency and willing to take responsibility for what happens, understanding that you have to vote.  If you don’t vote, everything else is a conversation.”

And Democrats are also taking advantage of some star power of their own to rev up the party base including Trump’s predecessor, Barack Obama.

Obama recently rallied Democrats in Pennsylvania, targeting those who have skipped voting in past midterm elections.

“They will say, ‘Well, I am going to wait until the presidential election.’  This one is actually more important.  This is actually more important than any election that we have seen in a long time.”

Trump as motivator

For both sides, there is little doubt that Trump will be the central figure in next month’s election.

“He has been out there endorsing people and working in a way that many thought when he was elected he would not be or working within the Republican Party and with other candidates,” said John Fortier of the Bipartisan Policy Center in Washington.

“So he is fully in, for better or worse, and he will certainly help some candidates in Republican places, but may turn off people in others.” Fortier is a frequent guest on VOA’s “Encounter.”

Democrats have been turning out in big numbers in special elections and in primaries since last year, and that is a positive sign for the opposition, said Jim Kessler, a senior vice president for policy at Third Way, a center-left policy research group.

“I expect Democrats to take the House. I now even think they might take the Senate, even though the map is so difficult out there. The excitement among Democratic voters is very, very high.  Republican voters are turning out too, but Democratic voters are really turning out,” said Kessler.

Many experts predict a Democratic takeover of the House would stop President Trump’s agenda in its tracks and put the White House on the defensive.  Some Democrats have talked about trying to impeach Trump.

In short, there is little likelihood of looking for common ground, according to George Washington University analyst Lara Brown.

“The truth is, we are just not in the 90s anymore, and by that I mean that there really is not an appetite on either side for compromise.

Trump is expected to stay busy on the campaign trail right up until Election Day, hopeful of blunting a Democratic surge that not only jeopardizes Republican control of both the House and Senate, but also could place severe constraints on his presidency.

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Kavanaugh Battle Intensifies Midterm Campaign

In five weeks, U.S. voters head to the polls to elect a new Congress and the outcome will have a profound impact on the next two years of Donald Trump’s presidency.

Intensity is building for the Nov. 6 election, especially among opposition Democrats seeking to win back control of the House of Representatives.  But both parties could become energized, depending on the outcome of the polarizing confirmation battle over Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

During the weekend, President Trump was on the campaign trail in West Virginia, whipping up support for Kavanaugh and blasting Democrats.

“I’m not running, but I’m really running and that is why I am all over the place fighting for great candidates,” Trump told the crowd in Wheeling, West Virginia.  “You see what is going on, you see those horrible, horrible, radical group of Democrats and you see it happening right now.”

Emotional hearing

The fight over Kavanaugh has animated those in favor of the judge and those opposed in the wake of a sexual assault allegation made by California professor Christine Blasey Ford.

Ford detailed the alleged assault in emotional and riveting testimony last week before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

“Brett’s assault on me drastically altered my life.  For a very long time, I was too afraid and ashamed to tell anyone the details.”

Supporters have rallied around Kavanaugh after the judge issued a combative denial later in the hearing.

“This confirmation process has become a national disgrace.  You have replaced advice and consent with search and destroy.”

A final Senate vote on Kavanaugh is on hold until the FBI completes an investigation related to the allegations aired in the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing.  Trump said Monday he wants a “comprehensive investigation” but he also added, “I’d like it to go quickly.”

Declining support

A new Quinnipiac University poll found that 48 percent of Americans surveyed oppose Kavanaugh’s confirmation, while 42 percent are in favor.  Women voters in particular oppose Kavanaugh’s appointment by a margin of 55 to 37 percent.  Men support the judge, 49 to 40 percent.

Amid the furor over Kavanaugh, Trump is making a furious push around the country to help Republicans hold their narrow majority in the Senate.

“Promise me, you have to get out for the midterms,” Trump implored supporters during a recent rally in Las Vegas, Nevada.  “Don’t be complacent.  You have got to get out for the midterms.  You have got to vote.”

Many Democrats seem cautiously optimistic about their chances in November of flipping the House of Representatives back under their control.

But even House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi says the party still has to follow through by turning out voters.  “Seeing the urgency and willing to take responsibility for what happens, understanding that you have to vote.  If you don’t vote, everything else is a conversation.”

And Democrats are also taking advantage of some star power of their own to rev up the party base including Trump’s predecessor, Barack Obama.

Obama recently rallied Democrats in Pennsylvania, targeting those who have skipped voting in past midterm elections.

“They will say, ‘Well, I am going to wait until the presidential election.’  This one is actually more important.  This is actually more important than any election that we have seen in a long time.”

Trump as motivator

For both sides, there is little doubt that Trump will be the central figure in next month’s election.

“He has been out there endorsing people and working in a way that many thought when he was elected he would not be or working within the Republican Party and with other candidates,” said John Fortier of the Bipartisan Policy Center in Washington.

“So he is fully in, for better or worse, and he will certainly help some candidates in Republican places, but may turn off people in others.” Fortier is a frequent guest on VOA’s “Encounter.”

Democrats have been turning out in big numbers in special elections and in primaries since last year, and that is a positive sign for the opposition, said Jim Kessler, a senior vice president for policy at Third Way, a center-left policy research group.

“I expect Democrats to take the House. I now even think they might take the Senate, even though the map is so difficult out there. The excitement among Democratic voters is very, very high.  Republican voters are turning out too, but Democratic voters are really turning out,” said Kessler.

Many experts predict a Democratic takeover of the House would stop President Trump’s agenda in its tracks and put the White House on the defensive.  Some Democrats have talked about trying to impeach Trump.

In short, there is little likelihood of looking for common ground, according to George Washington University analyst Lara Brown.

“The truth is, we are just not in the 90s anymore, and by that I mean that there really is not an appetite on either side for compromise.

Trump is expected to stay busy on the campaign trail right up until Election Day, hopeful of blunting a Democratic surge that not only jeopardizes Republican control of both the House and Senate, but also could place severe constraints on his presidency.

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Trump Rallies in Tennessee to Boost Senate Hopeful Blackburn

President Donald Trump is back in Tennessee, trying to push U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn’s Senate bid over the finish line.

 

Trump headlined a high-dollar, closed-door fundraiser for Blackburn in Johnson City before appearing at a packed rally at the Freedom Hall Civic Center.

 

Blackburn is in a tight race against the state’s Democratic ex-Gov. Phil Bredesen, who, like other Democratic candidates across Trump country, has painted himself as a pragmatist willing to work with the president on certain issues. The Tennessee campaign is among several closely watched races expected to determine control of the Senate, and Republicans are desperate to defend a narrow two-seat majority in the face of surging Democratic enthusiasm.

 

And the stakes couldn’t be clearer. The rally comes as the FBI is continuing to investigate sexual misconduct allegations against Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh — an FBI investigation that was forced by a small group of undecided senators who could sink the nomination. Trump earlier Monday disputed reports that his White House has tried to narrow the scope of the investigation and limit which witnesses the FBI could interview, saying he wants them “to do a very comprehensive investigation, whatever that means.”

 

Trump is planning a busy week of campaign travel, with trips to a handful of states including Mississippi, Minnesota and Kansas as he tries to boost Republican turnout for the midterm elections.

 

Blackburn’s contest, in a state that Trump won by 26 points, has drawn especially heavy interest from the White House, with repeat visits by both Trump and Vice President Mike Pence.

 

Bredesen has tried to distance himself from the national Democratic Party, presenting himself as an independent thinker who will support Trump’s policies when they’re beneficial to the state.

 

“I need to make clear to everybody my independence from all of the national Democratic stuff,” the former two-term governor recently told The Associated Press.

 

Blackburn and Bredesen are seeking the seat of Republican Sen. Bob Corker, who is retiring.

 

Bredesen, who would be the first Democrat to win a Senate campaign in Tennessee since Al Gore in 1990 if he’s victorious, has run TV ads in which he says that he’s “not running against Donald Trump” and learned long ago to “separate the message from the messenger.” He was holding an event in Chattanooga on Monday night that he’d hoped would be a debate with Blackburn, and he has been needling her for not agreeing to one.

 

Trump, as he has in other states, is expected to argue Bredesen is not the centrist he says he is and will wind up voting with Democratic leaders including Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi if he gets to Washington.

 

Blackburn, meanwhile, has stressed her ties to Trump, running ads that feature footage of his last rally in the state in May.

 

“Phil, whatever the hell his name is, this guy will 100 percent vote against us every single time,” Trump said at the time.

 

Trump offered an early endorsement of Blackburn in April, tweeting that she is “a wonderful woman who has always been there when we have needed her. Great on the Military, Border Security and Crime.”

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Trump Rallies in Tennessee to Boost Senate Hopeful Blackburn

President Donald Trump is back in Tennessee, trying to push U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn’s Senate bid over the finish line.

 

Trump headlined a high-dollar, closed-door fundraiser for Blackburn in Johnson City before appearing at a packed rally at the Freedom Hall Civic Center.

 

Blackburn is in a tight race against the state’s Democratic ex-Gov. Phil Bredesen, who, like other Democratic candidates across Trump country, has painted himself as a pragmatist willing to work with the president on certain issues. The Tennessee campaign is among several closely watched races expected to determine control of the Senate, and Republicans are desperate to defend a narrow two-seat majority in the face of surging Democratic enthusiasm.

 

And the stakes couldn’t be clearer. The rally comes as the FBI is continuing to investigate sexual misconduct allegations against Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh — an FBI investigation that was forced by a small group of undecided senators who could sink the nomination. Trump earlier Monday disputed reports that his White House has tried to narrow the scope of the investigation and limit which witnesses the FBI could interview, saying he wants them “to do a very comprehensive investigation, whatever that means.”

 

Trump is planning a busy week of campaign travel, with trips to a handful of states including Mississippi, Minnesota and Kansas as he tries to boost Republican turnout for the midterm elections.

 

Blackburn’s contest, in a state that Trump won by 26 points, has drawn especially heavy interest from the White House, with repeat visits by both Trump and Vice President Mike Pence.

 

Bredesen has tried to distance himself from the national Democratic Party, presenting himself as an independent thinker who will support Trump’s policies when they’re beneficial to the state.

 

“I need to make clear to everybody my independence from all of the national Democratic stuff,” the former two-term governor recently told The Associated Press.

 

Blackburn and Bredesen are seeking the seat of Republican Sen. Bob Corker, who is retiring.

 

Bredesen, who would be the first Democrat to win a Senate campaign in Tennessee since Al Gore in 1990 if he’s victorious, has run TV ads in which he says that he’s “not running against Donald Trump” and learned long ago to “separate the message from the messenger.” He was holding an event in Chattanooga on Monday night that he’d hoped would be a debate with Blackburn, and he has been needling her for not agreeing to one.

 

Trump, as he has in other states, is expected to argue Bredesen is not the centrist he says he is and will wind up voting with Democratic leaders including Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi if he gets to Washington.

 

Blackburn, meanwhile, has stressed her ties to Trump, running ads that feature footage of his last rally in the state in May.

 

“Phil, whatever the hell his name is, this guy will 100 percent vote against us every single time,” Trump said at the time.

 

Trump offered an early endorsement of Blackburn in April, tweeting that she is “a wonderful woman who has always been there when we have needed her. Great on the Military, Border Security and Crime.”

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