Category Archives: Business

economy and business news

Qatar Lifts Controversial Exit Visa System for Workers

Qatar amended its residency laws on Tuesday to allow foreign workers to leave the country without exit permits from their employers, a provision which labour rights groups have long said should be abolished.

Doha is keen to show it is tackling allegations of worker exploitation as it prepares to host the 2022 soccer World Cup, which it has presented as a showcase of its progress and development.

Most migrant workers would be able to leave the country without having to obtain permits from their employers under the law, said the International Labour Organization in a statement via its Doha office.

The ILO hailed the move as a “significant step” for gas-rich Qatar, which committed last year to introducing sweeping labour reforms, including changes to the exit visa system.

“The ILO welcomes the enactment of Law No. 13, which will have a direct and positive impact on the lives of migrant workers in Qatar,” said Houtan Homayounpour, the head of the ILO office in Doha, which was set up in April.

The official Qatar News Agency confirmed the adoption of Law No. 13, saying it amended “certain provisions” of previous laws regulating the entry, exit and residency of expatriates. It did not specify which provisions or offer details on the changes.

Labour and rights groups have attacked Qatar for its “kafala” sponsorship system, which is common in Gulf states where large portions of the population is foreign.

Qatar’s system still requires the country’s 1.6 million mainly Asian foreign workers to obtain their employers’ consent before changing jobs, which the groups say leaves workers open to abuse.

The government’s other pledged reforms include introduction of a minimum wage and a grievance procedure for workers.

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Aid Agency: Yemen’s Plunging Economy Threatens to Kill More People Than War

Yemen’s tanking economy threatens to kill more people than bombs and guns, an aid agency warned on Tuesday as the currency hit its lowest level ever, compounding the world’s biggest hunger crisis.

The Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) said soaring food prices were pushing many people closer to the brink in a country where millions are already close to famine.

“This economic collapse could kill even more Yemenis than the violence underlying it,” NRC’s Yemen country director Mohamed Abdi said, adding that food prices in some places had doubled in recent days.

“The situation is terrible. If something is not done it is only going to get worse,” he told Reuters by phone.

The Yemeni rial was exchanging at 630 to the dollar in the port city of Aden on Monday, according to the NRC, up from less than 250 at the beginning of the conflict in 2015.

Protests over the economy, which erupted in Aden on Sunday, were continuing Tuesday, Abdi said.

Three-quarters of Yemen’s population — 22 million people — are in need of humanitarian assistance.

More than 28,000 people have been killed or wounded during the war and 3 million have been uprooted, according to United Nations officials. Thousands more have died from malnutrition, disease and poor health.

The war pits the government of President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi, based in the south and backed by Saudi Arabia, against the Iran-aligned Houthi movement that controls the north including the capital Sanaa.

“Even buying an egg is very expensive now,” the NRC quoted one woman in the port city of Hodeida as saying.

“Before we would spare what we could to help beggars in the streets, but now we have nothing left to offer.”

Abdi said it was “heartbreaking” to see civil servants who have not been paid for two years reduced to begging in order to feed their families.

The World Food Program (WFP) says 8.4 million people are “precariously close to famine.”

WFP’s Yemen representative Stephen Anderson said there had been a dramatic increase in severe hunger in the last year as food prices rose and jobs dried up.

“Yemen is in free fall. We are extremely worried about the worsening economic conditions,” he told Reuters.

He said the WFP and aid agencies were targeting the people closest to famine, but there were another 10 million people who were going hungry and not getting help.

“Our concern is that if prices continue to rise, it will tip more people into severe hunger,” Anderson said.

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Aid Agency: Yemen’s Plunging Economy Threatens to Kill More People Than War

Yemen’s tanking economy threatens to kill more people than bombs and guns, an aid agency warned on Tuesday as the currency hit its lowest level ever, compounding the world’s biggest hunger crisis.

The Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) said soaring food prices were pushing many people closer to the brink in a country where millions are already close to famine.

“This economic collapse could kill even more Yemenis than the violence underlying it,” NRC’s Yemen country director Mohamed Abdi said, adding that food prices in some places had doubled in recent days.

“The situation is terrible. If something is not done it is only going to get worse,” he told Reuters by phone.

The Yemeni rial was exchanging at 630 to the dollar in the port city of Aden on Monday, according to the NRC, up from less than 250 at the beginning of the conflict in 2015.

Protests over the economy, which erupted in Aden on Sunday, were continuing Tuesday, Abdi said.

Three-quarters of Yemen’s population — 22 million people — are in need of humanitarian assistance.

More than 28,000 people have been killed or wounded during the war and 3 million have been uprooted, according to United Nations officials. Thousands more have died from malnutrition, disease and poor health.

The war pits the government of President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi, based in the south and backed by Saudi Arabia, against the Iran-aligned Houthi movement that controls the north including the capital Sanaa.

“Even buying an egg is very expensive now,” the NRC quoted one woman in the port city of Hodeida as saying.

“Before we would spare what we could to help beggars in the streets, but now we have nothing left to offer.”

Abdi said it was “heartbreaking” to see civil servants who have not been paid for two years reduced to begging in order to feed their families.

The World Food Program (WFP) says 8.4 million people are “precariously close to famine.”

WFP’s Yemen representative Stephen Anderson said there had been a dramatic increase in severe hunger in the last year as food prices rose and jobs dried up.

“Yemen is in free fall. We are extremely worried about the worsening economic conditions,” he told Reuters.

He said the WFP and aid agencies were targeting the people closest to famine, but there were another 10 million people who were going hungry and not getting help.

“Our concern is that if prices continue to rise, it will tip more people into severe hunger,” Anderson said.

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Ethiopia Opens Logistics Sector to Foreign Investment

Ethiopia will open its logistics sector to foreign investors but cap their participation, the state investment body said on Tuesday in the latest reform to loosen the government’s control of the economy.

Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed has presided over a shake-up of one of the most heavily-regulated economies in Africa since his appointment in April.

But while Ethiopia has introduced incentives such as tax holidays and subsidized loans to boost investment, bureaucracy and logistics constraints leave it at a low ranking in World Bank global trade logistics indexes.

The latest move by the Ethiopian Investment Board – a body headed by Abiy and comprised of several ministers and the central bank governor – lifted restrictions on foreign investment in packaging, forwarding and shipping agency services.

Those sectors were previously reserved exclusively to Ethiopian nationals. Foreign firms will now be allowed to take stakes of up to 49 percent in logistics businesses.

The Ethiopian Investment Commission, a government body that handles investment issues such as licensing and promotion, said opening up this sector to foreign investors had become necessary.

This will “improve the provision of high-end logistics services while local firms acquire world class knowledge, expertise, management, and systems by working jointly with globally reputed logistics providers,” it said in a statement.

The ruling EPRDF coalition, in power since 1991, has long supported deep state involvement. But it said earlier this year that Ethiopia needed economic reforms to sustain rapid growth and boost exports amid a severe hard currency shortage.

Abiy, 42, was appointed by the EPRDF after his predecessor, Hailemariam Desalegn, resigned in February after three years of unrest in which hundreds of people were killed by security forces.

   

 

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Ethiopia Opens Logistics Sector to Foreign Investment

Ethiopia will open its logistics sector to foreign investors but cap their participation, the state investment body said on Tuesday in the latest reform to loosen the government’s control of the economy.

Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed has presided over a shake-up of one of the most heavily-regulated economies in Africa since his appointment in April.

But while Ethiopia has introduced incentives such as tax holidays and subsidized loans to boost investment, bureaucracy and logistics constraints leave it at a low ranking in World Bank global trade logistics indexes.

The latest move by the Ethiopian Investment Board – a body headed by Abiy and comprised of several ministers and the central bank governor – lifted restrictions on foreign investment in packaging, forwarding and shipping agency services.

Those sectors were previously reserved exclusively to Ethiopian nationals. Foreign firms will now be allowed to take stakes of up to 49 percent in logistics businesses.

The Ethiopian Investment Commission, a government body that handles investment issues such as licensing and promotion, said opening up this sector to foreign investors had become necessary.

This will “improve the provision of high-end logistics services while local firms acquire world class knowledge, expertise, management, and systems by working jointly with globally reputed logistics providers,” it said in a statement.

The ruling EPRDF coalition, in power since 1991, has long supported deep state involvement. But it said earlier this year that Ethiopia needed economic reforms to sustain rapid growth and boost exports amid a severe hard currency shortage.

Abiy, 42, was appointed by the EPRDF after his predecessor, Hailemariam Desalegn, resigned in February after three years of unrest in which hundreds of people were killed by security forces.

   

 

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Yemen to Give Civil Servants Raises; Protests Rage Against Economy

Yemen’s government says it is giving civil servants and pensioners pay raises, after protests against the country’s woeful economy nearly paralyzed a major port city Sunday.

Officials have not said when the raises would take effect or how much they will be.

Demonstrations against the economy in the port of Aden continued Monday. Many shops were closed, and some people burned tires in the streets.

Some of the marchers demanded to be paid in dollars, accusing senior officials of taking their salaries in the U.S.-based currency while paying the rank-and-file in the increasingly weak Yemeni rial.

The rial has lost more than half its value against the dollar since Iranian-backed Houthi rebels seized the capital of Sanaa in 2014, sending the Western-recognized government into exile in Saudi Arabia.

It has since returned to set up shop in Aden.

Airstrikes

Meanwhile, the Houthis are demanding a war crimes investigation against the Saudi-led coalition after an airstrike last month that killed 40 children.

In an appeal Monday to the International Criminal Court, the Houthis asked the court to look into its “humanitarian conscience.”

A coalition missile struck a market in a Yemeni town near the Saudi border last month, killing 51 people. Among the dead were 40 children on a school bus coming back from a summer camp outing.

The coalition called the airstrike a “mistake.” It promised to hold those behind the attack legally responsible and to compensate the victims.

But the Houithis accuse the Saudis of being both the “judge and the jury” and “making light” of the civilian deaths.

U.N. human rights officials have said they believe both sides in Yemen may be responsible for war crimes.

The Saudi-led airstrikes have compounded the misery in Yemen, which is not only one of the world’s poorest nations, but is also on the edge of famine.

The U.N. has said about 80 percent of Yemeni civilians lack enough food and medical care.

The coalition airstrikes have obliterated entire neighborhoods, including hospitals and schools.

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Yemen to Give Civil Servants Raises; Protests Rage Against Economy

Yemen’s government says it is giving civil servants and pensioners pay raises, after protests against the country’s woeful economy nearly paralyzed a major port city Sunday.

Officials have not said when the raises would take effect or how much they will be.

Demonstrations against the economy in the port of Aden continued Monday. Many shops were closed, and some people burned tires in the streets.

Some of the marchers demanded to be paid in dollars, accusing senior officials of taking their salaries in the U.S.-based currency while paying the rank-and-file in the increasingly weak Yemeni rial.

The rial has lost more than half its value against the dollar since Iranian-backed Houthi rebels seized the capital of Sanaa in 2014, sending the Western-recognized government into exile in Saudi Arabia.

It has since returned to set up shop in Aden.

Airstrikes

Meanwhile, the Houthis are demanding a war crimes investigation against the Saudi-led coalition after an airstrike last month that killed 40 children.

In an appeal Monday to the International Criminal Court, the Houthis asked the court to look into its “humanitarian conscience.”

A coalition missile struck a market in a Yemeni town near the Saudi border last month, killing 51 people. Among the dead were 40 children on a school bus coming back from a summer camp outing.

The coalition called the airstrike a “mistake.” It promised to hold those behind the attack legally responsible and to compensate the victims.

But the Houithis accuse the Saudis of being both the “judge and the jury” and “making light” of the civilian deaths.

U.N. human rights officials have said they believe both sides in Yemen may be responsible for war crimes.

The Saudi-led airstrikes have compounded the misery in Yemen, which is not only one of the world’s poorest nations, but is also on the edge of famine.

The U.N. has said about 80 percent of Yemeni civilians lack enough food and medical care.

The coalition airstrikes have obliterated entire neighborhoods, including hospitals and schools.

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Hope, Caution as Kim Jong Un Shifts to North Korea’s Economy

Tanned and wearing a swimsuit, So Myong Il walks to the barbecue pit and throws on some clams.

 

He obviously loves the beach he’s on as well as the rugged, emerald Chilbo mountains that rise abruptly behind it. He loves them enough to forget, for a moment at least, that he is a senior official sent to deliver an ideology-soaked pitch singing their praises and instead lets the natural beauty surrounding him speak for itself.

 

Comrade So sees great things for North Korean attractions like this.

Hotels, big and small. Tourists from all over the country, maybe the world. “As long as we have the leadership of our respected Marshal,” he says, referring to leader Kim Jong Un, “our future will be bright indeed.”

 

So wouldn’t think of questioning the leader, but there is a hint of apprehension in his voice. And he isn’t alone.

 

North Korea is pushing ahead with a new strategy of economic development and the intensified diplomacy with China, South Korea and the United States that such a move requires. But hopes for a better future are mixed with concern over potential downsides of political or social volatility, and something that’s harder to articulate: a fear of the unknown – even if it appears far more promising than the arduous path the country has been on for decades.

Even before announcing in January that he had sufficiently perfected his nuclear arsenal and could start to focus on other things, Kim has held economic development to be his primary long-term concern.

 

He has allowed markets and entrepreneurialism to flourish and, since succeeding his father as leader seven years ago, has dramatically transformed the skyline of the capital, Pyongyang, with several high-rise districts. The transformation in the east coast city of Wonsan, where Kim has a summer villa, has been almost as spectacular.

 

As Kim prepares for the 70th anniversary of North Korea’s founding on Sept. 9, his ambitious development plan is being implemented, from the small-time renovation of town halls to the almost biblical-scale mobilization of “soldier-builders,” who are working around the clock to turn the remote northern city of Samjiyon into yet another showcase of Pyongyang-style socialism.

 

Economic development – and how U.S. capital and know-how could speed it along – was President Donald Trump’s big carrot when he met with Kim in Singapore three months ago to try to negotiate a denuclearization deal.

 

But Kim’s diplomatic overtures aren’t intended to open the door to American capitalists, a scenario that would make any good party cadre shudder. They are aimed at breaking down support for sanctions and getting the U.S. to step out of the way. Kim’s game is to play China and the U.S. off each other, grab whatever concessions he can along the way and adjust his position as the situation evolves.

 

In the meantime, lest anyone get the wrong idea, the ruling Workers’ Party of Korea has begun churning out paeans to socialism in its daily newspaper along with anti-capitalism, anti-imperialism screeds that underscore North Korea’s official opposition to essentially anything that might be considered the American way of life. Or, as it’s known in the jargon of North Korea’s propaganda machine, “the imperialists’ bourgeois ideological and cultural poisoning.”


 

The past few months have been tense in Pyongyang.

 

Restrictions on some of the movements of foreign diplomats have been tightened, for example, and even requests by The Associated Press to interview government officials or to speak with regular citizens have mostly been denied.

 

Uncertain of where it might all end up, state-run media have provided only limited coverage of Kim’s meetings with Trump in June and his multiple summits with Chinese President Xi Jinping and South Korean President Moon Jae-in. Reports have portrayed Kim as the consummate statesman, firmly in charge of a carefully considered strategy to make his country safer and more prosperous.

 

Kim is ardently wooing South Korean investment to help him build the very things Trump was offering: infrastructure, particularly roads and railways, and the development of selected tourism zones. After a high-profile chill last year, he is also actively courting Beijing, which continues to be an essential source of fuel, a key market for North Korea’s coal and other natural resources and a fairly reliable check on U.S. power in the region.

 

Pyongyang’s explanation for the shift in its foreign policy has been consistent: Having successfully built a credible nuclear deterrent to U.S. aggression, Kim is reaching out to Seoul to join hands in a “for Koreans, by Koreans” effort to secure a lasting peace on the Korean Peninsula, unhindered by the meddling of foreign powers.

 

Undoubtedly, images of the leader smiling and shaking hands with Trump, whose face had never been on the front pages of their newspapers before, signaled a major and bewildering change to many North Koreans.

 

But officials have made sure they don’t have much time to ruminate on it.

 

Normal routines of work and study have been put on hold for large segments of the populace who have been mobilized for the development projects. Tens of thousands of people in Pyongyang, meanwhile, have spent the past several months feverishly preparing for mass rallies and mass games to mark the anniversary.


 

Mount Chilbo, a collection of rocky peaks and a stretch of largely untouched seashore on the country’s northeastern fringe, is one of North Korea’s most cherished natural wonders.

 

The first hotel for non-Korean visitors opened in the 1980s, followed in 2004 by homestay-style lodgings near the beach, said So, a North Hamgyong Province People’s Committee official. Together they have a capacity of fewer than 100 guests and only operate from April until early November.

 

Many North Koreans bring tents and sleep on the beach.

 

But even in this rustic corner of the country, the pressure to contribute to Kim’s grand development scheme is keenly felt.

 

So said he would soon travel to China to discuss possible areas of cooperation.

 

As an indicator of Kim’s success with Beijing, tourism from China is already on the rise. Pyongyang’s longer-term goal, however, is to tap the South Korean market. The idea is that, if handled properly, South Korean tourism would present a chance to promote the North in a positive light and boost its image within South Korea.

 

That’s a gamble too.

Back in the late 1990s and early 2000s, South Koreans were allowed to visit in a highly regulated and controlled manner, and massive investment from South Korean businesses helped the North fund infrastructure projects in the same Wonsan-Mount Kumgang area that Kim is focusing on now. But it ended badly in 2008 when a South Korean woman who entered a restricted area was shot to death by a North Korean soldier.

 

So said he believes Chilbo, like Kim’s pet projects in Wonsan, could be a big draw for tourists. But he worries about where the money will come from and what might be lost.

 

“Whatever we do, we need to protect the natural beauty of this place,” he said.”I think there will be many changes in the coming years. Plans are being discussed. But nothing is decided.”

 

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Hope, Caution as Kim Jong Un Shifts to North Korea’s Economy

Tanned and wearing a swimsuit, So Myong Il walks to the barbecue pit and throws on some clams.

 

He obviously loves the beach he’s on as well as the rugged, emerald Chilbo mountains that rise abruptly behind it. He loves them enough to forget, for a moment at least, that he is a senior official sent to deliver an ideology-soaked pitch singing their praises and instead lets the natural beauty surrounding him speak for itself.

 

Comrade So sees great things for North Korean attractions like this.

Hotels, big and small. Tourists from all over the country, maybe the world. “As long as we have the leadership of our respected Marshal,” he says, referring to leader Kim Jong Un, “our future will be bright indeed.”

 

So wouldn’t think of questioning the leader, but there is a hint of apprehension in his voice. And he isn’t alone.

 

North Korea is pushing ahead with a new strategy of economic development and the intensified diplomacy with China, South Korea and the United States that such a move requires. But hopes for a better future are mixed with concern over potential downsides of political or social volatility, and something that’s harder to articulate: a fear of the unknown – even if it appears far more promising than the arduous path the country has been on for decades.

Even before announcing in January that he had sufficiently perfected his nuclear arsenal and could start to focus on other things, Kim has held economic development to be his primary long-term concern.

 

He has allowed markets and entrepreneurialism to flourish and, since succeeding his father as leader seven years ago, has dramatically transformed the skyline of the capital, Pyongyang, with several high-rise districts. The transformation in the east coast city of Wonsan, where Kim has a summer villa, has been almost as spectacular.

 

As Kim prepares for the 70th anniversary of North Korea’s founding on Sept. 9, his ambitious development plan is being implemented, from the small-time renovation of town halls to the almost biblical-scale mobilization of “soldier-builders,” who are working around the clock to turn the remote northern city of Samjiyon into yet another showcase of Pyongyang-style socialism.

 

Economic development – and how U.S. capital and know-how could speed it along – was President Donald Trump’s big carrot when he met with Kim in Singapore three months ago to try to negotiate a denuclearization deal.

 

But Kim’s diplomatic overtures aren’t intended to open the door to American capitalists, a scenario that would make any good party cadre shudder. They are aimed at breaking down support for sanctions and getting the U.S. to step out of the way. Kim’s game is to play China and the U.S. off each other, grab whatever concessions he can along the way and adjust his position as the situation evolves.

 

In the meantime, lest anyone get the wrong idea, the ruling Workers’ Party of Korea has begun churning out paeans to socialism in its daily newspaper along with anti-capitalism, anti-imperialism screeds that underscore North Korea’s official opposition to essentially anything that might be considered the American way of life. Or, as it’s known in the jargon of North Korea’s propaganda machine, “the imperialists’ bourgeois ideological and cultural poisoning.”


 

The past few months have been tense in Pyongyang.

 

Restrictions on some of the movements of foreign diplomats have been tightened, for example, and even requests by The Associated Press to interview government officials or to speak with regular citizens have mostly been denied.

 

Uncertain of where it might all end up, state-run media have provided only limited coverage of Kim’s meetings with Trump in June and his multiple summits with Chinese President Xi Jinping and South Korean President Moon Jae-in. Reports have portrayed Kim as the consummate statesman, firmly in charge of a carefully considered strategy to make his country safer and more prosperous.

 

Kim is ardently wooing South Korean investment to help him build the very things Trump was offering: infrastructure, particularly roads and railways, and the development of selected tourism zones. After a high-profile chill last year, he is also actively courting Beijing, which continues to be an essential source of fuel, a key market for North Korea’s coal and other natural resources and a fairly reliable check on U.S. power in the region.

 

Pyongyang’s explanation for the shift in its foreign policy has been consistent: Having successfully built a credible nuclear deterrent to U.S. aggression, Kim is reaching out to Seoul to join hands in a “for Koreans, by Koreans” effort to secure a lasting peace on the Korean Peninsula, unhindered by the meddling of foreign powers.

 

Undoubtedly, images of the leader smiling and shaking hands with Trump, whose face had never been on the front pages of their newspapers before, signaled a major and bewildering change to many North Koreans.

 

But officials have made sure they don’t have much time to ruminate on it.

 

Normal routines of work and study have been put on hold for large segments of the populace who have been mobilized for the development projects. Tens of thousands of people in Pyongyang, meanwhile, have spent the past several months feverishly preparing for mass rallies and mass games to mark the anniversary.


 

Mount Chilbo, a collection of rocky peaks and a stretch of largely untouched seashore on the country’s northeastern fringe, is one of North Korea’s most cherished natural wonders.

 

The first hotel for non-Korean visitors opened in the 1980s, followed in 2004 by homestay-style lodgings near the beach, said So, a North Hamgyong Province People’s Committee official. Together they have a capacity of fewer than 100 guests and only operate from April until early November.

 

Many North Koreans bring tents and sleep on the beach.

 

But even in this rustic corner of the country, the pressure to contribute to Kim’s grand development scheme is keenly felt.

 

So said he would soon travel to China to discuss possible areas of cooperation.

 

As an indicator of Kim’s success with Beijing, tourism from China is already on the rise. Pyongyang’s longer-term goal, however, is to tap the South Korean market. The idea is that, if handled properly, South Korean tourism would present a chance to promote the North in a positive light and boost its image within South Korea.

 

That’s a gamble too.

Back in the late 1990s and early 2000s, South Koreans were allowed to visit in a highly regulated and controlled manner, and massive investment from South Korean businesses helped the North fund infrastructure projects in the same Wonsan-Mount Kumgang area that Kim is focusing on now. But it ended badly in 2008 when a South Korean woman who entered a restricted area was shot to death by a North Korean soldier.

 

So said he believes Chilbo, like Kim’s pet projects in Wonsan, could be a big draw for tourists. But he worries about where the money will come from and what might be lost.

 

“Whatever we do, we need to protect the natural beauty of this place,” he said.”I think there will be many changes in the coming years. Plans are being discussed. But nothing is decided.”

 

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IOM: Returning Nigerian Migrants Benefit from Business Training Skills

The International Organization for Migration reports more than 270 Nigerian migrants who recently returned from Libya have completed a skills training course to help them start their own businesses.

Migrants attending this weeklong event in the Nigerian capital Lagos have shared stories of the business frustrations that drove them to try to go to Europe in search of better economic opportunities.

U.N. migration agency spokesman, Paul Dillon, told VOA the migrants also have shared stories of the abuse and suffering they endured at the hands of smugglers and traffickers in Libya. At the same time, he said returnees enrolled in this business course have spoken of their hopes for the future.

“The goal of these types of initiatives is always to give people options and providing them with business skills training, for example. It certainly does that.Start up a small business at home, get hired on by a local company, build your life back in Nigeria. I think that is the goal and also to encourage formal migration efforts,” he said.

This is the 21st training course since the program was started in April 2017. IOM reports more than 2,000 Nigerian returnees have participated in courses given in Lagos, Edo, Nassarawa, Kano and Kaduna States.

Dillon said many of the returnees have become involved in collective reintegration schemes or community-based projects, such as fruit juice, palm oil and plantain processing factories.

He said training now is focused on creating more sustainable businesses, not just on regular trading, buying and selling. Therefore, he said there is greater concentration on agriculture-related businesses, which are more sustainable and more beneficial to the returnees’ communities.

He said IOM, together with the Ministry of Labor and the Lagos Chamber of Commerce and industry are organizing a job fair at the end of September.This, he said, will give returnees the opportunity to meet leaders in Nigeria’s private sector and to search for jobs to match their skills.

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